Transfer of skills from simulation lab to surgical services: Impact of a decade long laparoscopic urology surgical course

Mohammed Hassan Khan, Muhammad Aslam, Alison McNeilly, Benjie Tang, Ghulam Nabi (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

Objective: To investigate the impact of decade-long dedicated laparoscopic urology surgical skills course on the successful implementation of surgical services by the participants. Methods: A prospective database was maintained for all the participants in urological laparoscopic courses run by a single dedicated unit between January 2016 and December 2016. Data on various variables were collected using a follow-up validated questionnaire exploring speciality of clinical practice, challenges and need for additional training to establish clinical services, improvement in quality and frequency of laparoscopic courses. A subset of participants reported data of their outcomes in a national database available publically. Results: One hundred sixty one delegates were drawn from 18 countries attended laparoscopic skills courses during the study period of 10 years. Data were available for 154 (95.65%) participants. There were only 20 (20/154; 12.9%) responses to online website questionnaires despite 3 reminders. Further, follow-up through websites/telephonic contact/organizational contacts improved the response rate to 93% (143/154). Of the participants, 95% (135/143) felt that these courses should be continued, and they agreed to recommend them to their trainees in the future. More than 50% (81/143; 56.6%) of the participants performed laparoscopic/robotic surgery at various centers. Sixty two (62/143; 43.3%) did not pursue laparoscopic surgery as a career choice. Fifty six (56/81; 69%) participants were established laparoscopic surgeons were from the UK, and of them, 30 (30/56; 53.57%: 30/81; 37.04%) were established surgeons that contributed to publishing their results through professional organizations with the outcomes of all of these within normal ranges of their peers. Conclusions: A dedicated laparoscopic urological surgery course run over a decade had a significant impact on the skills of participants, and most participants were able to establish clinical practice catering to a large proportion of the UK population as well as a few centers internationally.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Surgical Education
Early online date21 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 21 Sep 2018

Fingerprint

Urology
Laparoscopy
simulation
Databases
Career Choice
Robotics
Quality Improvement
surgery
Reference Values
website
contact
Population
questionnaire
professional association
trainee
Surveys and Questionnaires
Surgeons
career

Keywords

  • Surgery
  • laparoscopy
  • nephrectomy
  • simulation
  • skills

Cite this

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title = "Transfer of skills from simulation lab to surgical services: Impact of a decade long laparoscopic urology surgical course",
abstract = "Objective: To investigate the impact of decade-long dedicated laparoscopic urology surgical skills course on the successful implementation of surgical services by the participants. Methods: A prospective database was maintained for all the participants in urological laparoscopic courses run by a single dedicated unit between January 2016 and December 2016. Data on various variables were collected using a follow-up validated questionnaire exploring speciality of clinical practice, challenges and need for additional training to establish clinical services, improvement in quality and frequency of laparoscopic courses. A subset of participants reported data of their outcomes in a national database available publically. Results: One hundred sixty one delegates were drawn from 18 countries attended laparoscopic skills courses during the study period of 10 years. Data were available for 154 (95.65{\%}) participants. There were only 20 (20/154; 12.9{\%}) responses to online website questionnaires despite 3 reminders. Further, follow-up through websites/telephonic contact/organizational contacts improved the response rate to 93{\%} (143/154). Of the participants, 95{\%} (135/143) felt that these courses should be continued, and they agreed to recommend them to their trainees in the future. More than 50{\%} (81/143; 56.6{\%}) of the participants performed laparoscopic/robotic surgery at various centers. Sixty two (62/143; 43.3{\%}) did not pursue laparoscopic surgery as a career choice. Fifty six (56/81; 69{\%}) participants were established laparoscopic surgeons were from the UK, and of them, 30 (30/56; 53.57{\%}: 30/81; 37.04{\%}) were established surgeons that contributed to publishing their results through professional organizations with the outcomes of all of these within normal ranges of their peers. Conclusions: A dedicated laparoscopic urological surgery course run over a decade had a significant impact on the skills of participants, and most participants were able to establish clinical practice catering to a large proportion of the UK population as well as a few centers internationally.",
keywords = "Surgery, laparoscopy, nephrectomy, simulation, skills",
author = "Khan, {Mohammed Hassan} and Muhammad Aslam and Alison McNeilly and Benjie Tang and Ghulam Nabi",
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day = "21",
doi = "10.1016/j.jsurg.2018.08.026",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Surgical Education",
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T1 - Transfer of skills from simulation lab to surgical services

T2 - Impact of a decade long laparoscopic urology surgical course

AU - Khan, Mohammed Hassan

AU - Aslam, Muhammad

AU - McNeilly, Alison

AU - Tang, Benjie

AU - Nabi, Ghulam

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N2 - Objective: To investigate the impact of decade-long dedicated laparoscopic urology surgical skills course on the successful implementation of surgical services by the participants. Methods: A prospective database was maintained for all the participants in urological laparoscopic courses run by a single dedicated unit between January 2016 and December 2016. Data on various variables were collected using a follow-up validated questionnaire exploring speciality of clinical practice, challenges and need for additional training to establish clinical services, improvement in quality and frequency of laparoscopic courses. A subset of participants reported data of their outcomes in a national database available publically. Results: One hundred sixty one delegates were drawn from 18 countries attended laparoscopic skills courses during the study period of 10 years. Data were available for 154 (95.65%) participants. There were only 20 (20/154; 12.9%) responses to online website questionnaires despite 3 reminders. Further, follow-up through websites/telephonic contact/organizational contacts improved the response rate to 93% (143/154). Of the participants, 95% (135/143) felt that these courses should be continued, and they agreed to recommend them to their trainees in the future. More than 50% (81/143; 56.6%) of the participants performed laparoscopic/robotic surgery at various centers. Sixty two (62/143; 43.3%) did not pursue laparoscopic surgery as a career choice. Fifty six (56/81; 69%) participants were established laparoscopic surgeons were from the UK, and of them, 30 (30/56; 53.57%: 30/81; 37.04%) were established surgeons that contributed to publishing their results through professional organizations with the outcomes of all of these within normal ranges of their peers. Conclusions: A dedicated laparoscopic urological surgery course run over a decade had a significant impact on the skills of participants, and most participants were able to establish clinical practice catering to a large proportion of the UK population as well as a few centers internationally.

AB - Objective: To investigate the impact of decade-long dedicated laparoscopic urology surgical skills course on the successful implementation of surgical services by the participants. Methods: A prospective database was maintained for all the participants in urological laparoscopic courses run by a single dedicated unit between January 2016 and December 2016. Data on various variables were collected using a follow-up validated questionnaire exploring speciality of clinical practice, challenges and need for additional training to establish clinical services, improvement in quality and frequency of laparoscopic courses. A subset of participants reported data of their outcomes in a national database available publically. Results: One hundred sixty one delegates were drawn from 18 countries attended laparoscopic skills courses during the study period of 10 years. Data were available for 154 (95.65%) participants. There were only 20 (20/154; 12.9%) responses to online website questionnaires despite 3 reminders. Further, follow-up through websites/telephonic contact/organizational contacts improved the response rate to 93% (143/154). Of the participants, 95% (135/143) felt that these courses should be continued, and they agreed to recommend them to their trainees in the future. More than 50% (81/143; 56.6%) of the participants performed laparoscopic/robotic surgery at various centers. Sixty two (62/143; 43.3%) did not pursue laparoscopic surgery as a career choice. Fifty six (56/81; 69%) participants were established laparoscopic surgeons were from the UK, and of them, 30 (30/56; 53.57%: 30/81; 37.04%) were established surgeons that contributed to publishing their results through professional organizations with the outcomes of all of these within normal ranges of their peers. Conclusions: A dedicated laparoscopic urological surgery course run over a decade had a significant impact on the skills of participants, and most participants were able to establish clinical practice catering to a large proportion of the UK population as well as a few centers internationally.

KW - Surgery

KW - laparoscopy

KW - nephrectomy

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JO - Journal of Surgical Education

JF - Journal of Surgical Education

SN - 1931-7204

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