Translating agroecology into policy: The case of France and the United Kingdom

Raquel Ajates Gonzalez, Jessica Thomas, Marina Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)
33 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The popularity of agroecology has grown over the last few years as an alternative paradigm for food systems. This public attention has meant agroecology is increasingly becoming institutionalised and integrated into food policy frameworks. While there is a significant body of literature discussing the origins and worldviews intrinsic to agroecology, hardly any academic publications focusing on analysing policies claiming to have an agroecological focus exist. This first policy study of its kind contributes to the scarce agroecological policy literature by interrogating what we argue is a ‘translation’ process, which starts with the vision of agroecology and analyses how the concept changes once it has been operationalised into a policy document or law. Evidence from two European agricultural policy contexts, namely France and the United Kingdom, is presented. The methodology followed focused on the analysis of the context, problem construction, conceptualisation of agroecology, operational principles, and policy instruments included in the policy documents. Three main themes emerged from the case studies: differences in framing agroecology in the public policy arena; common dependencies to existing configurations influencing translations of agroecology in public policies; and the need for democratic discussion on the hybridisation of agroecology itself, as well as on implied, but often veiled, political choices. This paper concludes that a selective and relational hybridisation of agroecology is emerging during its ‘translation’ into public policies. View Full-Text
Original languageEnglish
Article number2930
Number of pages19
JournalSustainability
Volume10
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Aug 2018

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agroecology
public policy
France
food
policy studies
agricultural policy
worldview
popularity
paradigm
Law
methodology
evidence
food policy
policy

Keywords

  • Agricultural policy
  • Agroecology law
  • Hybridisation
  • Policy translation
  • Transcodage

Cite this

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Translating agroecology into policy : The case of France and the United Kingdom. / Ajates Gonzalez, Raquel; Thomas, Jessica; Chang, Marina.

In: Sustainability, Vol. 10, No. 8, 2930, 17.08.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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