Treatment patterns of hypertension and dyslipidaemia in hypertensive patients at higher and lower risk of cardiovascular disease in primary care in the United Kingdom

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    Abstract

    Few studies have investigated the presence of dyslipidaemia in hypertensive individuals. In addition, few data exist on the concurrent treatment of both conditions for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This retrospective cohort study examined treatment patterns for hypertension and dyslipidaemia among hypertensive patients in UK primary care. We defined a population of patients aged > or =40 years from the UK General Practice Research Database. Hypertensive individuals with > or =3 additional cardiovascular risk factors (ARFs) were compared with a cohort comprising hypertensive patients with or =3 ARFs, 94 185 with or =3 ARFs, 93 435 or =3 ARFs increased during the study. In 2001, approximately one-third of hypertensive patients with > or =3 ARFs were not receiving antihypertensives. Among those patients who received such treatment, the majority received > or =2 separate agents in accordance with current guidelines. Treatment for concurrent hypertension and dyslipidaemia was initiated in or =3 ARFs in each year. These findings demonstrate the under-recognition/undertreatment of cardiovascular risk factors in UK primary care among patients at risk of CVD.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)925-933
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Human Hypertension
    Volume21
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007

    Keywords

    • Adolescent
    • Adult
    • Aged
    • Aged, 80 and over
    • Cardiovascular Diseases
    • Dyslipidemias
    • Family Practice
    • Female
    • Great Britain
    • Humans
    • Hypertension
    • Male
    • Middle Aged
    • Prevalence
    • Primary Health Care
    • Risk Factors

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