Trends in Acute Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma, Peripheral Iridotomy and Cataract Surgery in Scotland, 1998-2012

Stewart N. Gillan (Lead / Corresponding author), Peter J. Wilson, David S. Knight, Roshini Sanders

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    PURPOSE: We present rates of acute primary angle-closure glaucoma (APACG), peripheral iridotomy (PI) and cataract surgery in Scotland between 1998 and 2012.

    METHODS: The number of patients in Scotland with APACG in each of the years between 1998 and 2012 was obtained from Information Service Division (ISD) Scotland. Data was also obtained for patients who had undergone laser PI and cataract surgery. The annual rates of APACG, PI and cataract surgery were calculated using Scotland's population data during each of these years.

    RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2012 the rate of APACG in National Health Service patients decreased by 46.4% (from 46.7 to 25.0 per million, p < 0.005). The rate of PI increased overall by 116.3% (from 38.0 to 82.2 per million), but demonstrated a decrease of 48.2% (38.0 to 19.7 per million, p = 0.002) between 1998 and 2008, and an increase of 317.3% (19.7 to 82.2 per million, p = 0.005) between 2008 and 2012. Over the same 15-year period, cataract surgery increased by 73.4% (from 354.2 to 615.2 per 100,000, p < 0.005). In this timeframe, mid-year Scottish population estimates increased by 4.6%.

    CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate a significant reduction in the rate of APACG in the Scottish population between 1998 and 2012, along with a rising rate of PI and cataract surgery. The trend of decreasing APACG may be due to the increasing rate of cataract surgery in the same time period. This parallels patterns seen in other European countries. We discuss these findings together with other related epidemiological factors.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-5
    Number of pages5
    JournalOphthalmic Epidemiology
    Volume23
    Issue number1
    Early online date11 Jan 2016
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

    Fingerprint

    Angle Closure Glaucoma
    Scotland
    Cataract
    Population
    Information Services
    National Health Programs
    Lasers

    Keywords

    • Acute disease
    • Adult
    • Cataract extraction
    • Glaucoma, Angle-closure
    • Humans
    • Iridectomy
    • Iris
    • Middle aged
    • Scotland
    • Journal article

    Cite this

    Gillan, Stewart N. ; Wilson, Peter J. ; Knight, David S. ; Sanders, Roshini. / Trends in Acute Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma, Peripheral Iridotomy and Cataract Surgery in Scotland, 1998-2012. In: Ophthalmic Epidemiology. 2016 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 1-5.
    @article{0bd252a930834499baa1dba30caeb73e,
    title = "Trends in Acute Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma, Peripheral Iridotomy and Cataract Surgery in Scotland, 1998-2012",
    abstract = "PURPOSE: We present rates of acute primary angle-closure glaucoma (APACG), peripheral iridotomy (PI) and cataract surgery in Scotland between 1998 and 2012.METHODS: The number of patients in Scotland with APACG in each of the years between 1998 and 2012 was obtained from Information Service Division (ISD) Scotland. Data was also obtained for patients who had undergone laser PI and cataract surgery. The annual rates of APACG, PI and cataract surgery were calculated using Scotland's population data during each of these years.RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2012 the rate of APACG in National Health Service patients decreased by 46.4{\%} (from 46.7 to 25.0 per million, p < 0.005). The rate of PI increased overall by 116.3{\%} (from 38.0 to 82.2 per million), but demonstrated a decrease of 48.2{\%} (38.0 to 19.7 per million, p = 0.002) between 1998 and 2008, and an increase of 317.3{\%} (19.7 to 82.2 per million, p = 0.005) between 2008 and 2012. Over the same 15-year period, cataract surgery increased by 73.4{\%} (from 354.2 to 615.2 per 100,000, p < 0.005). In this timeframe, mid-year Scottish population estimates increased by 4.6{\%}.CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate a significant reduction in the rate of APACG in the Scottish population between 1998 and 2012, along with a rising rate of PI and cataract surgery. The trend of decreasing APACG may be due to the increasing rate of cataract surgery in the same time period. This parallels patterns seen in other European countries. We discuss these findings together with other related epidemiological factors.",
    keywords = "Acute disease, Adult, Cataract extraction, Glaucoma, Angle-closure, Humans, Iridectomy, Iris, Middle aged, Scotland, Journal article",
    author = "Gillan, {Stewart N.} and Wilson, {Peter J.} and Knight, {David S.} and Roshini Sanders",
    year = "2016",
    doi = "10.3109/09286586.2015.1083035",
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    Trends in Acute Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma, Peripheral Iridotomy and Cataract Surgery in Scotland, 1998-2012. / Gillan, Stewart N. (Lead / Corresponding author); Wilson, Peter J.; Knight, David S.; Sanders, Roshini.

    In: Ophthalmic Epidemiology, Vol. 23, No. 1, 2016, p. 1-5.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Trends in Acute Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma, Peripheral Iridotomy and Cataract Surgery in Scotland, 1998-2012

    AU - Gillan, Stewart N.

    AU - Wilson, Peter J.

    AU - Knight, David S.

    AU - Sanders, Roshini

    PY - 2016

    Y1 - 2016

    N2 - PURPOSE: We present rates of acute primary angle-closure glaucoma (APACG), peripheral iridotomy (PI) and cataract surgery in Scotland between 1998 and 2012.METHODS: The number of patients in Scotland with APACG in each of the years between 1998 and 2012 was obtained from Information Service Division (ISD) Scotland. Data was also obtained for patients who had undergone laser PI and cataract surgery. The annual rates of APACG, PI and cataract surgery were calculated using Scotland's population data during each of these years.RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2012 the rate of APACG in National Health Service patients decreased by 46.4% (from 46.7 to 25.0 per million, p < 0.005). The rate of PI increased overall by 116.3% (from 38.0 to 82.2 per million), but demonstrated a decrease of 48.2% (38.0 to 19.7 per million, p = 0.002) between 1998 and 2008, and an increase of 317.3% (19.7 to 82.2 per million, p = 0.005) between 2008 and 2012. Over the same 15-year period, cataract surgery increased by 73.4% (from 354.2 to 615.2 per 100,000, p < 0.005). In this timeframe, mid-year Scottish population estimates increased by 4.6%.CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate a significant reduction in the rate of APACG in the Scottish population between 1998 and 2012, along with a rising rate of PI and cataract surgery. The trend of decreasing APACG may be due to the increasing rate of cataract surgery in the same time period. This parallels patterns seen in other European countries. We discuss these findings together with other related epidemiological factors.

    AB - PURPOSE: We present rates of acute primary angle-closure glaucoma (APACG), peripheral iridotomy (PI) and cataract surgery in Scotland between 1998 and 2012.METHODS: The number of patients in Scotland with APACG in each of the years between 1998 and 2012 was obtained from Information Service Division (ISD) Scotland. Data was also obtained for patients who had undergone laser PI and cataract surgery. The annual rates of APACG, PI and cataract surgery were calculated using Scotland's population data during each of these years.RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2012 the rate of APACG in National Health Service patients decreased by 46.4% (from 46.7 to 25.0 per million, p < 0.005). The rate of PI increased overall by 116.3% (from 38.0 to 82.2 per million), but demonstrated a decrease of 48.2% (38.0 to 19.7 per million, p = 0.002) between 1998 and 2008, and an increase of 317.3% (19.7 to 82.2 per million, p = 0.005) between 2008 and 2012. Over the same 15-year period, cataract surgery increased by 73.4% (from 354.2 to 615.2 per 100,000, p < 0.005). In this timeframe, mid-year Scottish population estimates increased by 4.6%.CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate a significant reduction in the rate of APACG in the Scottish population between 1998 and 2012, along with a rising rate of PI and cataract surgery. The trend of decreasing APACG may be due to the increasing rate of cataract surgery in the same time period. This parallels patterns seen in other European countries. We discuss these findings together with other related epidemiological factors.

    KW - Acute disease

    KW - Adult

    KW - Cataract extraction

    KW - Glaucoma, Angle-closure

    KW - Humans

    KW - Iridectomy

    KW - Iris

    KW - Middle aged

    KW - Scotland

    KW - Journal article

    U2 - 10.3109/09286586.2015.1083035

    DO - 10.3109/09286586.2015.1083035

    M3 - Article

    VL - 23

    SP - 1

    EP - 5

    JO - Ophthalmic Epidemiology

    JF - Ophthalmic Epidemiology

    SN - 0928-6586

    IS - 1

    ER -