Urbanisation versus agriculture

A comparison of local genetic diversity and gene flow between wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus populations in human-modified landscapes

Amanda Wilson (Lead / Corresponding author), Brian Fenton, Gaynor Malloch, Brian Boag, Steve Hubbard, Graham Begg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Urbanisation and agriculture dramatically modify the landscapes available for use by wildlife, affecting key aspects of their ecology such as survival, foraging, predation, competition and reproductive success. Relatively little is known about the effects of urbanisation and agriculture on the genetic structure, gene flow and genetic diversity of wild species. Here, landscape genetic techniques were applied to compare local genetic diversity and gene flow between wood mouse populations in urban and arable landscapes. Using nine microsatellite markers, individuals were genotyped from six arable and seven urban sample sites. Inter-population genetic differentiation was significantly greater in urban than arable habitat, while allele richness, private allele richness and heterozygosity were higher for arable sample sites, with varying degrees of significance. These suggest that urban habitat was sufficiently fragmented to limit gene flow. To test the effect of landscape features on gene flow, several cost-distance measures were generated. Overland distance and Euclidean distance correlated best with inter-population genetic differentiation in arable habitat, whereas distances that accommodated differences in habitat quality better explained differentiation in urban habitat. There was no evidence that margins adjacent to roads, rivers or railways facilitated gene flow. Together, the results indicate that urban landscapes expose wood mice to greater fragmentation in habitat quality than arable areas, leading to greater population isolation that is not mitigated by the presence of dispersal corridors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-97
Number of pages11
JournalEcography
Volume39
Issue number1
Early online date23 Apr 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2016

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Apodemus sylvaticus
Apodemus
urbanization
human population
gene flow
agriculture
genetic variation
habitats
habitat quality
genetic differentiation
population genetics
allele
alleles
urban population
railroads
habitat
heterozygosity
railway
habitat fragmentation
genetic structure

Cite this

Wilson, Amanda ; Fenton, Brian ; Malloch, Gaynor ; Boag, Brian ; Hubbard, Steve ; Begg, Graham. / Urbanisation versus agriculture : A comparison of local genetic diversity and gene flow between wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus populations in human-modified landscapes. In: Ecography. 2016 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 87-97.
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Urbanisation versus agriculture : A comparison of local genetic diversity and gene flow between wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus populations in human-modified landscapes. / Wilson, Amanda (Lead / Corresponding author); Fenton, Brian; Malloch, Gaynor; Boag, Brian; Hubbard, Steve; Begg, Graham.

In: Ecography, Vol. 39, No. 1, 01.2016, p. 87-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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