Use of a modified hemi-body irradiation technique for metastatic carcinoma of the prostate: report of a 10-year experience

F. A. Bashir, J. M. Parry, P. M. Windsor

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    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Aims: To determine whether patients receiving hemi-body irradiation required further treatment to painful bone sites out with the radiation field (skull or lower leg), whether patients required further treatment to areas within the treated radiation field for pain or new skeletal events, and whether the treatment outcome was successful in terms of pain control. Toxicities, the need for transfusions and survival were also analysed. Materials and methods: In our retrospective review, 103 men aged 50-87 years, with skeletal metastases from prostate cancer, received modified hemi-body irradiation (HBI) during a consecutive 10-year period, using the same radiotherapy technique and dose. The upper HBI field excluded the region above the ramus of the mandible and the lower HBI field excluded the lower limb below the knee. A successful outcome was determined by assessing the pain response in combination with a change in analgesic intake. Results: Twenty patients received upper HBI; 17/20 (85%) had a successful outcome at the 6-week review, sustained in 94.1% at the final follow-up with no need for radiotherapy to the skull. Thirty-eight patients received lower HBI; 26/38 (68.4%) had a successful outcome at the 6-week review, sustained in 80.8% at the final follow-up with no need for radiotherapy to the lower leg. Forty-five patients received sequential HBI; 33/45 (73.3%) had a successful outcome at the 6-week review, sustained in 87.9% at the final follow-up, with three patients requiring further radiotherapy to the skull (2/45) or lower leg (1/45). Only 5/103 patients (4.8%) developed new skeletal events in the treated area. Toxicity and transfusion requirements were minimal. Conclusions: Modifying the field size for single-fraction HBI does not have a significant effect on the final outcome of treatment, namely pain control and a need for additional radiotherapy. In our experience, modified HBI should be considered in patients with multiple bone pain sites, especially if they will probably require several visits for localised radiotherapy to single painful bone sites within a short period of time. © 2008 The Royal College of Radiologists.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)591-598
    Number of pages8
    JournalClinical Oncology
    Volume20
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2008

    Keywords

    • Aged
    • Aged, 80 and over
    • Blood Transfusion
    • Bone Neoplasms
    • Hemibody Irradiation
    • Humans
    • Male
    • Middle Aged
    • Pain Management
    • Palliative Care
    • Prostatic Neoplasms
    • Retrospective Studies
    • Survival Analysis

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