Using diaries in mixed methods design: Lessons from a cross-institutional research project on doctoral students’ social transition experiences

Jenna Mittelmeier, Bart Rienties, Kate Yue Zhang, Divya Jindal-Snape

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

This chapter considers solicited diaries as one possible method to incorporate within a mixed methods higher education research design. It defines mixed methods research broadly and outlining various approaches, purposes and key considerations for its use. The chapter explores the benefits and challenges of mixed methods diary designs through reflection on our own research examining doctoral students’ social community building experiences. It provides six key considerations for higher education researchers for developing rigorous mixed methods diary studies. Mixed methods diary research offers many benefits for approaching complex research topics, including those present in many higher education studies. Mixed methods diary research offers great potential, particularly as many diary research features are well-suited for mixed methods designs. Triangulating findings from diary research with other methods provides many benefits to researchers. Incorporating other methods alongside diaries can additionally help overcome perceived drawbacks or challenges of the method.


Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationExploring diary methods in higher education research
Subtitle of host publicationOpportunities, choices and challenges
EditorsXuemeng Cao, Emily F. Henderson
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge Taylor & Francis Group
Chapter1
Pages15-28
Number of pages14
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9780429326318
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Publication series

NameResearch into Higher Education

Keywords

  • Diaries
  • Transitions
  • Higher Education

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