Validity and reliability of the CARE Measure in secondary care

S. W. Mercer, D. J. Murphy

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    35 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose – The Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) Measure is a validated tool for assessing the patients' perception of the doctors' communication in primary care. The present study aims to evaluate the potential usefulness of the CARE Measure in secondary care in a single Hospital Trust in Scotland.

    Design/methodology/approach – A total of 1,015 out-patients attending 25 consultants across ten specialities anonymously completed the questionnaire immediately after their appointment. Overall satisfaction, estimated consultation length, satisfaction with consultation length, and demographic and socio-economic variables were also recorded.

    Findings – The number of missing values and “not applicable” responses to the ten CARE Measure items was extremely low (3.4 per cent). Almost 90 per cent of patients felt the CARE Measure items were of major importance. The measure had a high internal reliability (Cronbach's alpha 0.94) and reduced to a single factor. Overall CARE Measure score correlated with overall satisfaction (r=0.7, p<0.0001), whether patients would recommend the doctor (r=0.6, p<0.0001), and satisfaction with consultation length (r=0.6, p<0.0001). Multi-regression analysis showed that personal continuity of care, consultation length, and patient age positively influenced CARE Measure score, but the effect size was small. Patients' gender, marital status, general health, and socio-economic factors did not influence scores. Reliability analysis indicated that 40 patients were required per doctor in order to achieve an overall reliability co-efficient of above 0.7.

    Practical implications – Secondary care patients across a range of specialities have endorsed the CARE Measure as a relevant tool. It has high face and concurrent validity, internal and structural reliability and is not subject to major influences by demographic or socio-economic factors. These findings support the feasibility and reliability of the CARE Measure in secondary care.

    Originality/value – This pilot study indicates that the CARE Measure is considered by most patients to be of high relevance to everyday out-patient consultations in secondary care.


    Icon: Access.Document Options:
    Content access
    Icon: HTML documentView HTML
    Icon: View PDF. View PDF (430kb)
    References

    * References (20)

    Further reading

    * Related items

    Marked list
    Add to marked list:
    Bookmark & share
    Reprints & permissions
    Icon: RightsLink. Request
    © Emerald Group Publishing Limited | Copyright info | Site Policies
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)269-283
    JournalClinical Governance: an International Journal
    Volume13
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

    Fingerprint

    Secondary Care
    Reproducibility of Results
    Referral and Consultation
    Economics
    Outpatients
    Demography
    Continuity of Patient Care
    Marital Status
    Scotland
    Consultants

    Keywords

    • Communication
    • Customer satisfaction
    • Doctors
    • Individual perception
    • Medical care
    • Outpatients

    Cite this

    Mercer, S. W. ; Murphy, D. J. / Validity and reliability of the CARE Measure in secondary care. In: Clinical Governance: an International Journal. 2008 ; Vol. 13, No. 4. pp. 269-283.
    @article{c7e59e9166974342b48ffa93beb41020,
    title = "Validity and reliability of the CARE Measure in secondary care",
    abstract = "Purpose – The Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) Measure is a validated tool for assessing the patients' perception of the doctors' communication in primary care. The present study aims to evaluate the potential usefulness of the CARE Measure in secondary care in a single Hospital Trust in Scotland.Design/methodology/approach – A total of 1,015 out-patients attending 25 consultants across ten specialities anonymously completed the questionnaire immediately after their appointment. Overall satisfaction, estimated consultation length, satisfaction with consultation length, and demographic and socio-economic variables were also recorded.Findings – The number of missing values and “not applicable” responses to the ten CARE Measure items was extremely low (3.4 per cent). Almost 90 per cent of patients felt the CARE Measure items were of major importance. The measure had a high internal reliability (Cronbach's alpha 0.94) and reduced to a single factor. Overall CARE Measure score correlated with overall satisfaction (r=0.7, p<0.0001), whether patients would recommend the doctor (r=0.6, p<0.0001), and satisfaction with consultation length (r=0.6, p<0.0001). Multi-regression analysis showed that personal continuity of care, consultation length, and patient age positively influenced CARE Measure score, but the effect size was small. Patients' gender, marital status, general health, and socio-economic factors did not influence scores. Reliability analysis indicated that 40 patients were required per doctor in order to achieve an overall reliability co-efficient of above 0.7.Practical implications – Secondary care patients across a range of specialities have endorsed the CARE Measure as a relevant tool. It has high face and concurrent validity, internal and structural reliability and is not subject to major influences by demographic or socio-economic factors. These findings support the feasibility and reliability of the CARE Measure in secondary care.Originality/value – This pilot study indicates that the CARE Measure is considered by most patients to be of high relevance to everyday out-patient consultations in secondary care.Icon: Access.Document Options:Content accessIcon: HTML documentView HTMLIcon: View PDF. View PDF (430kb)References * References (20)Further reading * Related itemsMarked listAdd to marked list:Bookmark & shareReprints & permissions Icon: RightsLink. Request{\circledC} Emerald Group Publishing Limited | Copyright info | Site Policies",
    keywords = "Communication, Customer satisfaction, Doctors, Individual perception, Medical care, Outpatients",
    author = "Mercer, {S. W.} and Murphy, {D. J.}",
    year = "2008",
    doi = "10.1108/14777270810912969",
    language = "English",
    volume = "13",
    pages = "269--283",
    journal = "Clinical Governance: an International Journal",
    issn = "1477-7274",
    publisher = "Emerald",
    number = "4",

    }

    Validity and reliability of the CARE Measure in secondary care. / Mercer, S. W.; Murphy, D. J.

    In: Clinical Governance: an International Journal, Vol. 13, No. 4, 2008, p. 269-283.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Validity and reliability of the CARE Measure in secondary care

    AU - Mercer, S. W.

    AU - Murphy, D. J.

    PY - 2008

    Y1 - 2008

    N2 - Purpose – The Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) Measure is a validated tool for assessing the patients' perception of the doctors' communication in primary care. The present study aims to evaluate the potential usefulness of the CARE Measure in secondary care in a single Hospital Trust in Scotland.Design/methodology/approach – A total of 1,015 out-patients attending 25 consultants across ten specialities anonymously completed the questionnaire immediately after their appointment. Overall satisfaction, estimated consultation length, satisfaction with consultation length, and demographic and socio-economic variables were also recorded.Findings – The number of missing values and “not applicable” responses to the ten CARE Measure items was extremely low (3.4 per cent). Almost 90 per cent of patients felt the CARE Measure items were of major importance. The measure had a high internal reliability (Cronbach's alpha 0.94) and reduced to a single factor. Overall CARE Measure score correlated with overall satisfaction (r=0.7, p<0.0001), whether patients would recommend the doctor (r=0.6, p<0.0001), and satisfaction with consultation length (r=0.6, p<0.0001). Multi-regression analysis showed that personal continuity of care, consultation length, and patient age positively influenced CARE Measure score, but the effect size was small. Patients' gender, marital status, general health, and socio-economic factors did not influence scores. Reliability analysis indicated that 40 patients were required per doctor in order to achieve an overall reliability co-efficient of above 0.7.Practical implications – Secondary care patients across a range of specialities have endorsed the CARE Measure as a relevant tool. It has high face and concurrent validity, internal and structural reliability and is not subject to major influences by demographic or socio-economic factors. These findings support the feasibility and reliability of the CARE Measure in secondary care.Originality/value – This pilot study indicates that the CARE Measure is considered by most patients to be of high relevance to everyday out-patient consultations in secondary care.Icon: Access.Document Options:Content accessIcon: HTML documentView HTMLIcon: View PDF. View PDF (430kb)References * References (20)Further reading * Related itemsMarked listAdd to marked list:Bookmark & shareReprints & permissions Icon: RightsLink. Request© Emerald Group Publishing Limited | Copyright info | Site Policies

    AB - Purpose – The Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) Measure is a validated tool for assessing the patients' perception of the doctors' communication in primary care. The present study aims to evaluate the potential usefulness of the CARE Measure in secondary care in a single Hospital Trust in Scotland.Design/methodology/approach – A total of 1,015 out-patients attending 25 consultants across ten specialities anonymously completed the questionnaire immediately after their appointment. Overall satisfaction, estimated consultation length, satisfaction with consultation length, and demographic and socio-economic variables were also recorded.Findings – The number of missing values and “not applicable” responses to the ten CARE Measure items was extremely low (3.4 per cent). Almost 90 per cent of patients felt the CARE Measure items were of major importance. The measure had a high internal reliability (Cronbach's alpha 0.94) and reduced to a single factor. Overall CARE Measure score correlated with overall satisfaction (r=0.7, p<0.0001), whether patients would recommend the doctor (r=0.6, p<0.0001), and satisfaction with consultation length (r=0.6, p<0.0001). Multi-regression analysis showed that personal continuity of care, consultation length, and patient age positively influenced CARE Measure score, but the effect size was small. Patients' gender, marital status, general health, and socio-economic factors did not influence scores. Reliability analysis indicated that 40 patients were required per doctor in order to achieve an overall reliability co-efficient of above 0.7.Practical implications – Secondary care patients across a range of specialities have endorsed the CARE Measure as a relevant tool. It has high face and concurrent validity, internal and structural reliability and is not subject to major influences by demographic or socio-economic factors. These findings support the feasibility and reliability of the CARE Measure in secondary care.Originality/value – This pilot study indicates that the CARE Measure is considered by most patients to be of high relevance to everyday out-patient consultations in secondary care.Icon: Access.Document Options:Content accessIcon: HTML documentView HTMLIcon: View PDF. View PDF (430kb)References * References (20)Further reading * Related itemsMarked listAdd to marked list:Bookmark & shareReprints & permissions Icon: RightsLink. Request© Emerald Group Publishing Limited | Copyright info | Site Policies

    KW - Communication

    KW - Customer satisfaction

    KW - Doctors

    KW - Individual perception

    KW - Medical care

    KW - Outpatients

    U2 - 10.1108/14777270810912969

    DO - 10.1108/14777270810912969

    M3 - Article

    VL - 13

    SP - 269

    EP - 283

    JO - Clinical Governance: an International Journal

    JF - Clinical Governance: an International Journal

    SN - 1477-7274

    IS - 4

    ER -