Violent cavitation from optically configured microbubble pairs

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    Contrast agent microbubble cavitation has received increased attention in recent years, since it has been recognised as significantly enhancing the bio-effects of ultrasound mediated intra-cellular drug delivery, the technique better known as sonoporation. However, whilst the empirical credentials underscoring the potential of sonoporation to usefully load the full gamut of biological cells and tissues continues to grow, there remains a distinct lack of clarity in relation to the underlying mechanism of action. Here, we have adopted the viewpoint that this aspect will only become elucidated by imaging the interaction of individual ultrasound stimulated microbubbles with nearby cells, and corroborating subsequent damage or disruption to that specific modes of bubble activity. Previous studies that have used time lapse photomicrography to image free microbubbles have demonstrated their vigorous interaction with pressure pulses, especially at mechanical indices greater than circa 0.5. For the purposes of the present paper, we extend that approach and use corroborative cell imaging by both electron- and force microscopies to illuminate an unusual mode for membrane disruption from violent microbubble cavitation.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings - 7th European Conference on Noise Control 2008
    Pages927-930
    Number of pages4
    Publication statusPublished - 2008
    Event7th European Conference on Noise Control 2008, EURONOISE 2008 - Paris, France
    Duration: 29 Jun 20084 Jul 2008

    Publication series

    NameProceedings - European Conference on Noise Control
    ISSN (Print)2226-5147

    Conference

    Conference7th European Conference on Noise Control 2008, EURONOISE 2008
    Country/TerritoryFrance
    CityParis
    Period29/06/084/07/08

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