Visual analysis of body movements by neurons in the temporal cortex of the macaque monkey: a preliminary report

D. I. Perrett, P. A. J. Smith, A. J. Mistlin, A. J. Chitty, A. S. Head, D. D. Potter, R. Broennimann, A. D. Milner, M. A. Jeeves

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    Abstract

    Movement provides biologically important information about the nature (and intent) of animate objects. We have studied cells in the superior temporal sulcus of the macaque monkey which seem to process such visual information. We found that the majority of cells in this brain region were selective for type of movement and for stimulus form, most cells responding only to particular movements of the body or some part of it. A variety of cell types emerged, including cells sensitive to: translation of bodies in view, movements into view (appearance) or out of view (disappearance) and the articulation and rotation of the body/head. Directional selectivity for cells sensitive to translation tended to lie along one of 3 orthogonal Cartesian axes centred on the monkey (towards/away, left/right and up/down). One type of rotation sensitive cell was tuned to rotation about one or more of these axes, a second type was sensitive to different head rotations which brought the face to confront the monkey or turned the face away. Reconstructions of cell positions indicated that cells of the same type were clumped anatomically both across the surface of the cortex and perpendicular to the surface.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)153-170
    Number of pages18
    JournalBehavioural Brain Research
    Volume16
    Issue number2-3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1985

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    Macaca
    Temporal Lobe
    Haplorhini
    Neurons
    Head
    Brain

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    Perrett, D. I. ; Smith, P. A. J. ; Mistlin, A. J. ; Chitty, A. J. ; Head, A. S. ; Potter, D. D. ; Broennimann, R. ; Milner, A. D. ; Jeeves, M. A. / Visual analysis of body movements by neurons in the temporal cortex of the macaque monkey : a preliminary report. In: Behavioural Brain Research. 1985 ; Vol. 16, No. 2-3. pp. 153-170.
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    title = "Visual analysis of body movements by neurons in the temporal cortex of the macaque monkey: a preliminary report",
    abstract = "Movement provides biologically important information about the nature (and intent) of animate objects. We have studied cells in the superior temporal sulcus of the macaque monkey which seem to process such visual information. We found that the majority of cells in this brain region were selective for type of movement and for stimulus form, most cells responding only to particular movements of the body or some part of it. A variety of cell types emerged, including cells sensitive to: translation of bodies in view, movements into view (appearance) or out of view (disappearance) and the articulation and rotation of the body/head. Directional selectivity for cells sensitive to translation tended to lie along one of 3 orthogonal Cartesian axes centred on the monkey (towards/away, left/right and up/down). One type of rotation sensitive cell was tuned to rotation about one or more of these axes, a second type was sensitive to different head rotations which brought the face to confront the monkey or turned the face away. Reconstructions of cell positions indicated that cells of the same type were clumped anatomically both across the surface of the cortex and perpendicular to the surface.",
    author = "Perrett, {D. I.} and Smith, {P. A. J.} and Mistlin, {A. J.} and Chitty, {A. J.} and Head, {A. S.} and Potter, {D. D.} and R. Broennimann and Milner, {A. D.} and Jeeves, {M. A.}",
    year = "1985",
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    Perrett, DI, Smith, PAJ, Mistlin, AJ, Chitty, AJ, Head, AS, Potter, DD, Broennimann, R, Milner, AD & Jeeves, MA 1985, 'Visual analysis of body movements by neurons in the temporal cortex of the macaque monkey: a preliminary report', Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 16, no. 2-3, pp. 153-170. https://doi.org/10.1016/0166-4328(85)90089-0

    Visual analysis of body movements by neurons in the temporal cortex of the macaque monkey : a preliminary report. / Perrett, D. I.; Smith, P. A. J.; Mistlin, A. J.; Chitty, A. J.; Head, A. S.; Potter, D. D.; Broennimann, R.; Milner, A. D.; Jeeves, M. A.

    In: Behavioural Brain Research, Vol. 16, No. 2-3, 1985, p. 153-170.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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