Vitamin D increases killing of intracellular Leishmania amazonensis in vitro independently of macrophage oxidative mechanisms

Patrícia de Almeida MacHado, Douglas Oliveira Escrivani, Daniel Claudio Oliveira Gomes, Bartira Rossi-Bergmann, Suzana Passos Chaves, Elaine Soares Coimbra (Lead / Corresponding author), Herbert Leonel de Matos Guedes (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Vitamin D has been reported to activate macrophage microbicidal mechanisms by inducing the production of antimicrobial peptides and nitric oxide (NO), but conversely has been shown to contribute to a greater susceptibility to L. amazonensis infection in mice. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the role of vitamin D during intracellular infection with L. amazonensis by examining its effect on macrophage oxidative mechanisms and parasite survival in vitro. Vitamins D2 and D3 significantly inhibited promastigote and amastigote growth in vitro. Vitamin D3 was not able to induce NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in uninfected macrophages or macrophages infected with L. amazonensis. In addition, vitamin D3 in combination with IFN-γ did not enhance amastigote killing and in fact, significantly reduced NO and ROS production when compared with the effect of IFN-γ alone. In this work, we demonstrated that vitamin D directly reduces parasite growth in infected macrophages (approximately 50 - 60% at 50 μM) but this effect is independent of the activation of macrophage oxidative mechanisms. These findings will contribute to a better understanding of the role of vitamin D in cutaneous leishmaniasis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1792-1800
Number of pages9
JournalParasitology
Volume147
Issue number14
Early online date22 Sep 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Leishmania amazonensis
  • macrophages
  • NO
  • ROS
  • Vitamin D

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