Why UK companies hedge interest rate risk

Alpa Dhanani, Suzanne Fifield, Christine Helliar, Lorna Stevenson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the interest rate risk management (IRRM) practices of UK companies. In particular, the study examines five theories that have been advanced in the literature to explain why companies hedge: tax and regulatory arbitrage: under-investment, volatility of earnings and future planning: financial distress: managerial self-interest: and economies of scale. 

    Design/methodology/approach The paper uses a questionnaire survey to examine the importance of hedging theories and to look at the detailed risk management practices of companies. 

    Findings The research findings confirm that all five theories of financial risk management have some support in practice. However, while the responses to some questions supported the theories, other information elicited from the questionnaires did not. This finding demonstrates that studies which employ large disaggregated datasets that result in generalised conclusions often miss the dynamic nature of corporate affairs and that, as such, more qualitative research is needed in this area. 

    Originality/value The use of a questionnaire survey facilitates an investigation of the IRRM practices of companies on an individual basis rather than the aggregated analysis afforded by most quantitative studies in finance. In addition, the qualitative approach adopted here permits an examination of many factors that relate to risk management practices, rather than just a limited number of financial ratios or factors that are typically used in studies of large datasets.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)72-90
    Number of pages19
    JournalStudies in Economics and Finance
    Volume24
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 13 Mar 2007

    Fingerprint

    Risk management
    Hedge
    Interest rate risk
    Management practices
    Factors
    Questionnaire survey
    Qualitative research
    Financial distress
    Questionnaire
    Hedging
    Economies of scale
    Design methodology
    Tax arbitrage
    Underinvestment
    Regulatory arbitrage
    Financial ratios
    Financial risk management
    Qualitative approaches
    Finance
    Planning

    Keywords

    • Hedging
    • Interest rates
    • Risk management
    • United Kingdom

    Cite this

    Dhanani, Alpa ; Fifield, Suzanne ; Helliar, Christine ; Stevenson, Lorna. / Why UK companies hedge interest rate risk. In: Studies in Economics and Finance. 2007 ; Vol. 24, No. 1. pp. 72-90.
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    Why UK companies hedge interest rate risk. / Dhanani, Alpa; Fifield, Suzanne; Helliar, Christine; Stevenson, Lorna.

    In: Studies in Economics and Finance, Vol. 24, No. 1, 13.03.2007, p. 72-90.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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